Tag Archives: show trucks

Keep on Truckin’ & Showin’

By Larry Pruitt

We haven’t shown very much in the last couple of years.  Bustin’ Out! is now over ten years old.  Our priorities have changed somewhat as we have been off racing with the grandkids.  Along with that, the truck is starting to show its miles and as much as you try to keep up with making a good showing wear and tear has taken its toll.

We are making plans to do quite of bit of work and make some (we think) pretty cool changes to make it new and improved.  Work has already started on some new and different stainless and we are going to tweak the paint a bit along with updating and changing the lighting package.  We are planning to start showing again next year.

This truck showing bug gets in your crawl and it’s hard to shake it off.  As far as addictions are concerned, we think this is a pretty good one to have.  You go down the highway everyday and you catch yourself looking at trucks that go past and you say to yourself, “I like what they did with the lights there or the way they used a different piece of chrome here and there.”  You’re always thinking of ways to incorporate something new into your ride and making it your own design so it doesn’t appear that you just stole the idea from somebody.  It does become challenging to add any kind custom work to your truck.  Every time you think you’ve run out of ways to customize an aspect of your truck, somebody somewhere in this great country of ours will come up with something completely new that we have never seen before, and within a couple years there will be variations that builders will make to that new innovative idea.  So, it’s an ever-evolving phenomenon that seems to always take it to a higher level of cool.

I must caution you with new and innovative cutting-edge ideas also comes the practical dilemma.  As I have said before, you have to make sure the changes to your truck is conducive to the application of your business.  For example, don’t install a big rear drop bumper with twenty LED lights on a dump truck.  You will most definitely have the coolest truck in town, that is, until you unload it for the first time.

I have always had a soft spot in my heart for the working trucks.  The trucks that you see on the highway when it’s pouring down rain and you’ll also see them sitting in traffic in the middle of an ice storm.  I have to take my hat off to those men and women.  They’re the same people that you’ll be competing with at the truck show next summer.

2017 Walcott Truckers Jamboree Supertrucks Beauty Contest: Trucker’s Choice Winner, 1st Place Polish & Detail, 1st Place Working Truck Combo 2012-17, 2nd Place Custom Graphics, 3rd Place Lights at Night Road Legal, 3rd Place Interior OEM Sleeper. Brian Dreher of Campbellsport, WI. 2016 Peterbilt 389 & 2016 Great Dane, $$$.

At times there seems to be a growing disparage between “show only” and “working trucks” and I’d like to commend the truck show promoters on their ability to keep them separated at all of the big shows.  If you let the two together it only serves to make the competitions less fun and as I believe, unfair for both groups.  As far as I’m concerned, those two groups are opposite ends of the spectrum.  I have seen so called “working trucks” show up to a show on a trailer.  One thing that a truck show competitor loves to hear is when someone walks up to them at a show and says, “You don’t use this truck for work do you?” and you see the pride in their face and hear it in their voice when they tell them, “Oh no, this truck runs five or six hundred miles a day.”

2017 Kenly 95 Gear’d Up Truck Show: Best Interior Winner, 2nd Place Tractor Trailer Combo, Honorable Mention in Lights & Uniqueness. Mike Harlow, 2016 Peterbilt 389 Carhauler.

I would also like, at this time, to thank the great folks at the Iowa 80 Group for giving me this platform.  I have enjoyed this opportunity to be able to share some of our experiences and kind of reminisce about our travels as truck show competitors.  I would like to give a big THANK YOU to all the folks who have taken the time out of their day or evening to read my ramblings.  Some have told me how much they have enjoyed my story and I must say I was really touched by those nice comments.

So long for now, you never know we may come back with another group of stories, we’ll see! Until then, keep on truckin’ and showin’.


Larry Pruitt is an owner-operator with over 20 years of experience and has been involved in trucking for close to 40 years. He is a firefighter in North St. Louis County Missouri and resides with his wife, Jeanette, in Saint Clair, MO.


 

Your First Truck Show

By Larry Pruitt

Hello again.  Well you should have your truck in good shape by now, Righttttttt!  It’s time to find out what the judges think now.  CLICK HERE to read more posts from my blog series.

The first time is always the most difficult.  We have found that the best way to go about the show type cleaning is to start at the top of the truck and work your way down.  That way you won’t have to go back and redo something you have already cleaned.  One exception to this rule is tire shine.  Don’t put tire shine until your truck is in place for judging and before you do your cleaning on the fenders.  I guarantee, if you’re anything like me, you will find that stuff in places you never thought you could — that stuff goes everywhere!

Our 2007 Mack ‘Bustin’ Out!’

Your first show will have you working harder and redoing stuff more times than you could ever imagine.  I remember at our first show, we worked until late in the night for a couple of nights before the show.  I can remember sitting there at about midnight a couple of days before the show thinking, “If we don’t win something at this show I’m may have to rethink this deal over.  This may not be worth the effort.”  For the record let me tell you it was well worth it.

Our first show that we really tried to compete, was at the Walcott Truckers Jamboree in 2010.  We had the truck looking good, we left the house early on Wednesday morning and I think every bug in the state of Missouri, Illinois, and Iowa converged on us and committed suicide on the front of my truck.  Then to add insult to injury, I believe it also rained before we got there.

Colin Stuart’s Peterbilt

The first stop after unloading everything was to the Truckomat.  That gets you a pretty good start on the cleaning process.  Dry the truck as fast as you can so you have as few WATERSPOTS as possible (see The Road to Becoming a Truck Show Competitor for more advice about avoiding the dreaded waterspots).  Now it’s time to get parked.  The folks at Iowa 80 park the show trucks in line, they wanted to put me next this really nice Peterbilt owned by Colin Stuart.  Colin is a very successful and experienced truck show competitor.  I can remember asking the Iowa 80 Super Trucks Beauty Contest people, “Can you park me somewhere else?  I don’t stand a chance sitting next to this truck with airbrushed horses on the side of the sleeper.”  Not only did his truck have a beautiful paint job, but I found out later that it also has a working fireplace in the sleeper.  They told me, “Don’t worry, you guys are in separate classes”, so I thought, “OK, I’m good with that.”  I introduced myself to Colin and told him this was my first real show and I didn’t really know what we were in for.

I want to publicly let people know how much people like Colin Stuart and Ron Brubaker helped us at that first show THANK YOU so much for your help and guidance.

Ron Brubaker’s 1993 Peterbilt 379 ‘One of a Kind’

 

So back to the cleaning.  We worked all Wednesday evening and then again Thursday morning all the way up until they called ‘rags down’ at 10 o’clock.  When the judges started to make their rounds, I was lucky enough to watch Colin talk with the judges.  Colin told me that when the judges come around, show and explain what you have done to your truck and why you did certain things.  Point out all the details that you’ve done.  For example on Bustin’ Out! we have puppy paws at different places on the truck near a handrail or door handle.  This is something the judges may not notice until you point it out to them.  Remember also, that when you show the truck you are as much a part of the truck as the truck itself.  We had polo shirts embroidered with the name of the truck made that we wear, we even had them made for the kids and grandkids too.

The judging took two or three hours to complete, so now the only thing to do now was wait for the awards.  We didn’t really expect much as this was our first show and all.  I believe if I remember correctly, we wound up getting 2nd in our class which made me perfectly satisfied.  I’m sitting there reveling in our accomplishment and then they got to the other awards for theme and polishing.  We wound up getting an award for our fireman theme and 1st for OEM sleeper detail.  To say the least, we were most definitely blown away by how much success we experienced on our first big show.  Tradition at Walcott is that all the winners get together for a group photo and I remember Colin asking me if I thought that all that work was worth it, I told him, “I believe it was!”

Larry, Colin, & Ron receiving trophies at the 2010 Walcott Truckers Jamboree

I can remember driving home the next day and I would start laughing out loud and Jeanette asked me what was so funny, and I said, “I can’t believe what just happened!  I never expected all of this.”  So then the conversation started about what are we going to change to get even better for the next show.  It was an incredible experience that we look back on often, and as I said before, “I believe the effort was well worth it.”


Larry Pruitt is an owner-operator with over 20 years of experience and has been involved in trucking for close to 40 years. He is a firefighter in North St. Louis County Missouri and resides with his wife, Jeanette, in Saint Clair, MO.


 

Show Trucks: The Planning Process

By Larry Pruitt

When you make the decision to start showing your truck, the first thing to look at is the segment of trucking you’re involved in. You might be involved in dry van work and all you do is drop and hook and never leave the paved road. There are other segments like grain hauling when you load on farms and elevators and the dust gets to be an inch thick. Dust is not so bad by itself but when it rains you can have a real mess. Take a look at other decked out trucks in your segment and use your own experience to determine which accessories work for you and what will not.

I found myself having to change the decking on top of my frame behind the fifth wheel so I could detach the gooseneck on our lowboy trailer. We decided to use a rhino lining on top because the stainless would get scratched. Eventually we decided to put rhino lining all of the decking to make it balance out. When you decide how to accessorize your truck, you have to take into account the segment you are working in. You can’t put mud flaps that run an inch off the pavement and be hauling grain off of a farm road.

During the planning phase, keep in mind what end result you are trying to accomplish. You want to make the truck look balanced; for example, don’t put a ton of lights on the front end and nothing toward the rear. Take some extra time to plan the lighting. Try to keep the lights the same type throughout the project. We went with clear lens on Bustin’ Out! just to be different and try to set it apart from the others. Using the same type, lens color, and size of lights is good because it allows you to keep a stock of lights for replacements also. If you use a different style of light it may not be readily available at the local truck stop on the road.

Chrome and stainless accents give this show truck a classic, old school look.

The next part of the project to look at is, shiny or painted? I’ve seen a lot of trucks that had almost everything on it painted, such as mirrors, tanks, even the front bumper. I’ve seen trucks with just the body painted and everything else chrome, aluminum, and stainless steel. The painted route is easier to get ready for a show; sand it down, repaint and you are done. I’m too much of an old school guy I guess, I like the balance of paint and chrome. The bad thing about the shiny route is there is a lot of polishing and rubbing. We have had our share of black and purple hands at different shows but we feel that it’s worth it.

Painted accents give this show truck an edgy, modern look.

The last part of this process, as far as we are concerned, is the CLEANING. You may think that cleaning shouldn’t be in the planning process, but it is part of the process and a part of the maintenance of a show truck. Probably the most overlooked part as well. It’s very important to clean the parts everybody can see and even the parts they can’t see. Pressure wash the underside on a regular basis as well as the engine compartment. The frame takes the most abuse and is cleaned the least. For a small price, you can get your frame sanded, painted, and clear coated. It makes a big difference when the judges show up and is money well spent. I can’t stress enough the importance of staying on top of the washing of your ride. If you get lax on keeping it clean it will just be more of a chore to get it to level you want to maintain. Oh yeah, I forgot to mention, make sure you get ALL of the WATERSPOTS!

The interior of the truck is just as important as the exterior. This doesn’t take a lot of time or effort after you get it real clean. Every couple of days run a duster over the dash and over the shelves in the sleeper. Keep the carpet clean, or if you have a rubber mat, take a wet rag to it when you dust the dash. Everybody knows that a clean truck runs and drives better when it’s clean.

Building a show truck can be done slowly and methodically. Set a budget amount each month on how much you want to spend. Slowly get the truck where you want within your means. Moving at a slow pace gives you an opportunity to change your plan as you go along. Next time, we will discuss getting ready for the judges at your first competitive show.


Larry Pruitt is an owner-operator with over 20 years of experience and has been involved in trucking for close to 40 years. He is a firefighter in North St. Louis County Missouri and resides with his wife, Jeanette, in Saint Clair, MO.


 

The Road to Becoming a Truck Show Competitor

A True Story

By Larry Pruitt

There are as many truck show competitors as there are different stories about how they got there. Here is a little bit of how we got involved in truck show competitions.  Some competitors follow in the footsteps of family members, but most are first generation competitors such as Jeanette and me.

I believe it was back in 2009 we attended our first Walcott Truckers Jamboree. We had just purchased the 2007 Mack truck the winter before, but we also have a couple of antique trucks and we used the 2007 Mack to haul our 1959 Mack to the show. The antiques at Walcott are just an exhibition, not a competition. Well, that year we were running late and didn’t get there until Thursday morning, the day of the judging for the Super Trucks.
That morning I went out to the truck stop to unload my ’59 Mack. I let Jeanette sleep in at the hotel and planned to meet her back at the hotel for breakfast after I unloaded the ’59 at the truck stop. I was visiting with a friend of mine while he was registering for the Super Truck Beauty Contest. He said that I should enter my ’07 Mack into the competition. My response to him was “Are you out of your freakin’ mind? My truck isn’t good enough to compete,” and we all laughed.
As I stood there, I overheard the ladies at the registration tent explaining about the different goodies that competitors received just for entering. Imagine that, free stuff just for entering! They got 10% off at the chrome shop just for entering and I thought, “I could use that discount” as I had a whole list of stuff I wanted to purchase for my new truck while we were up there. The goody that sealed the deal was for me was the two free pork chop dinners. If you aren’t aware, the pork chops at Iowa 80 are world famous! So signed up and I told my friend, “Yeah count me in.”

The judging started at 10 o’clock and it was already 8 o’clock, so I went across the way and got my truck washed at the Truckomat and halfway dried it off. I parked it in line with the trucks that were immaculate and just about perfect. I jumped into my pickup and went to the hotel to get Jeanette. You should have seen the look on her face when I told her, “Dear, hurry up and finish your breakfast we are in the Super Truck Beauty Contest and judging starts in 30 minutes.” On the way back to the truck stop I had to explain to her what had transpired earlier. I don’t know how many times she asked me, “Are you sure you know what you’re doing?” and I told her, “Of course not, but we’ll figure it out as we go.”

Judging at the 2009 Walcott Truckers Jamboree. Notice this clean Pete has no water spots!

We wiped some of the water spots off of the truck before the judges got to us, but the other 100,000 water spots stayed put. The judges came around, but they didn’t hang around very much. Knowing what I know now, I probably would have moved on also. To this day, water spots drive Jeanette crazy. The amount of beautiful trucks was awe inspiring and the attention to detail these competitors have for their rigs was mind boggling. Just for the record, I think we were the only entry with water spots.

 

My red Mack on display at the 2009 Walcott Trucker’s Jamboree

We visited with some of the other drivers and started some very good friendships that wonderful weekend. I asked them a lot of questions, and here are a couple of their suggestions.  Pick a theme and stick with it – We picked a fire theme and tied it in with the Mack bulldog.  Pay attention to the details – Be sure to fix all the rock chips, get all of the wax and bugs off, and line the lettering on the tires up to the top so you can read the brand of the tire. Oh yeah, most importantly… NO WATER SPOTS!  Needless to say, we didn’t receive any awards that year, but we vowed that the next Jamboree we would make a good showing.

 


Larry Pruitt is an owner-operator with over 20 years of experience and has been involved in trucking for close to 40 years. He is a firefighter in North St. Louis County Missouri and resides with his wife, Jeanette, in Saint Clair, MO.


 

Truck Show Season is Upon Us

By Larry Pruitt

The 2017 truck show season is here.  The first big one is held at the Mid-America Trucking Show, MATS, in Louisville at the end of March.  The truck show season runs in the Midwest until around the end of September.  If you’ve never checked out one of these competitions before, I strongly encourage everyone that has the opportunity to give it a look.  Some shows use the same scoring criteria year after year and so the competitors know what the judges are looking for and try to give the judges what they want.  Some are judged by the spectators and drivers decide who wins.  Truck shows range from National Championship Shows all the way down to local area shows and everything in between.  No matter what scale of show it is, usually a good time is had by all.

PKY Truck Beauty Championship contestants at the 2016 Mid-America Trucking Show

When you see the amount of time, money, and most importantly passion put into these true works of art, you will see the great amount of imagination and attention to detail.  One of the judges at the Superrigs competition told me several years ago that they can tell that some trucks are definitely an extension of the drivers distinct personality.

In my humble opinion,  the shows that spotlight “working trucks” are the better shows because these trucks work anywhere from 50,000 to 150,000 miles a year and still look as if they came off the showroom floor when it’s time to get judged.

Although some people spend a great deal of money, some of the best trucks at these events use more imagination than cash.  I believe some competitors could possibly chrome a truck completely, but that would lack imagination.  Most drivers try to find a balance between paint and chrome and stainless steel and overall cleanliness of their rides.

My Mack “Bustin’ Out!” show truck in 2015 at the Walcott Truckers Jamboree

I know firsthand the amount of time and planning that it takes to put a show truck together.  My wife, Jeanette, and I started showing back in 2009.  We made a lot of mistakes along the way, but learned a lot, and by the time 2012 came around we were having a great deal of success.  The success that we experienced was due in large part to our fellow competitors that answered a lot of stupid questions that I had, and they took the time to show us how to show a truck.  These are salt-of-the-earth people that we are proud to say have become very good friends.  We have not been showing the last year or so but we still travel to certain shows just to be able to visit with the folks that are a part of these competitions.

In future posts, we will discuss what it takes to become a competitor yourself, discuss things that work, and some things that absolutely didn’t work. So until then, think about different ways that you could make your ride stand out as you go about your business out there on the road.


Larry Pruitt is an owner-operator with over 20 years of experience and has been involved in trucking for close to 40 years. He is a firefighter in North St. Louis County Missouri and resides with his wife, Jeanette, in Saint Clair, MO.


 

Tribute Trucks

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

 

There are some really beautiful trucks on the road today; many of which are aimed at honoring our military. Last year, at the Walcott Truckers Jamboree, one tribute truck definitely stood out. The truck won Best Overall Theme with a design that very tastefully honors family members who have battled cancer; those who’ve lost and those who were lucky enough to win.

That truck is named Miles of Memories, and was the creation of Robert and Denise Errthum. It has a wrap that is comprised of photos taken in Kansas and Colorado.  Last year was their first time to show and they touched many visitors with the powerful message this truck shares.  After going to five funerals in four months; it hit home really hard.

“No One Fights Alone” is written in a blue and silver banner on the back of the bunk. Blue is the color that symbolizes all cancers. When the Errthums first talked about building a show truck this was not what they had in mind, but after enormous loss in their family they became inspired to do so.

Miles of Memories tribute truck, Robert and Denise Errthum

A show truck is a constant work in progress. Once you create something unique and show it, chances are you are going to see something similar on other trucks in the future. And when your truck is a rolling tribute to something that is near and dear to you, there are going to be people who want to talk to you and share their stories. Tribute trucks are special and shine a positive, caring light on our industry.

Another tribute truck that is really an amazing work of art is Sean McEndree’s Band of Brothers Purple Heart truck. Sean is a personal friend and he earned a Purple Heart serving our country. The wrap on Sean’s truck depicts the military, and it has many details that he made a deliberate effort to include. When the hood is rolled over there is a picture of hands holding a Purple Heart medal. On the side of the bunk is a picture of a soldier guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Band of Brothers tribute truck, Sean McEndree

Many trucks have signs “In Memory” of someone whom they have lost. It is a way to honor and remember that family member or dear friend.  I have an angel on the side of my bunk with her head hung over in grief to remember our dear friend, Bette Garber, who was a champion for the trucking industry through her photography of trucks and the life of trucking.  Her saying, “I can’t make you rich, but I can make you famous” is remembered by many.

If you are thinking about building a truck in tribute to honor a person, cause, or passion, do your research to find the right people to help you design and put together something that will be a true expression of what you are hoping to accomplish.  As you attend truck shows this year, take the time to talk to the owners of tribute trucks. There is always a moving story behind their masterpiece.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Ready, Set, Show!

Ready, Set, Show | Trucker TipsBy Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

 

 

Ready, Set, Show!- The Mid-America Trucking Show, held at the end of March each year, is the annual kickoff to the truck show season.  Let the fun and shining begin!The Mid-America Trucking Show, held at the end of March each year, is the annual kickoff to the truck show season.  Let the fun and shining begin! This year we got to experience the show in a different way since Kim decided to enter her 2007 Peterbilt 379 “Dark Angel” and her 2008 48’ stainless spread axle Utility reefer in the Paul K Young beauty contest part of the show. For the better part of the last many years we have been covering the show as media in order to report on it, it has been a REALLY long time since either of us has competed in it!

It was a bit of a trip down memory lane since we both used to show our old W900L Kenworth trucks, competing against each other and building a friendship at the same time. It was a different time then, but the camaraderie you build while working hard cleaning your truck is something inexplicable. You are competitors, yet you build a mutual respect that is very real and is proven to last a lifetime. Part of us go just so that we can reconnect with those we used to share experiences with long ago and this year we were not disappointed! We were reunited with many of our old friends from our show days and it was wonderful!

If you’ve never had the opportunity to experience entering a truck show, maybe it’s time you entertain the thought of putting your toes in the water. Maybe do as Justin Mosser did in Louisville, he jumped right in the deep end when, instead of entering first time, he entered all the classes and for his effort he took home a second place trophy for working interior! This young bull hauler was proud as punch of that trophy too, as he should have been, his truck was gorgeous and he definitely earned it! But he was truly surprised.

jamboree blog 4
2015 Walcott Trucker’s Jamboree

There are plenty of shows to choose from, you will probably be able to find one in your area or the area that you run through and you can google them or look them up in different trucking publications. I know Movin’ Out carries a current list all season long, both in their paper and on their website, but the one show you should definitely put on your calendar is the Walcott Truckers Jamboree!  The dates for this years Jamboree is July 14, 15, & 16. This is when Iowa 80 says thank you to the drivers that drive their business.

This show is an appreciation event that we both attend, Kim for many years, me for the last few years since we didn’t run the Interstate 80 lane, but it is one of the most fun events we have ever attended! The entire Moon family and their staff turn out to make sure this event truly meets the standards they set in letting their drivers know how much they are appreciated.

There are games and contests and prizes and fireworks, bouncy tents for kids and booths and the trucks in the show! Every single truck entered goes home with a trophy! NOBODY gets left out at this show. It’s truly a family event, one that everyone should plan to attend. The antique trucks here are nothing short of jaw dropping as well, it’s a jam packed 3 days, I can promise you!

So, clean up your truck and kick back, have fun and enjoy all the activities that are going on during the entire show.  Be sure to try one of the grilled Iowa chops that are not only yummy but legendary!

Just remember, when you get there, pull into their truck wash the Truck-O-Mat for a top shelf wash, then go park and get ready for some fun!

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Count Your Blessings

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

Count Your Blessings- This has been an amazing year for both of us! We are both blessed and thankful for each and every one of those blessings.

This has been an amazing year for both of us! We are both blessed and thankful for each and every one of those blessings. We would like to thank Heather DeBaillie and the Iowa 80 family for giving us the opportunity to write this blog for Iowa 80 Group. We are proud to be a part of the Iowa 80 family!

The Mid America Truck Show kicks off the truck show season in March and we were blessed to be able to attend the show together. Getting to share in seeing some new things in the industry, meeting up with old friends and having a good time, taking pictures of the beautiful trucks, and spending time together with trucks and truckers.

I am blessed and so grateful that this year I became an owner-operator again. Leasing my truck and trailer on with D & G Transportation was like going home, in fact I was going back to my last home as an owner-operator. Now, being back for nearly a year, I know it was the right decision and I look forward to many more years here.

Judging at the Walcott Truckers Jamboree in July was a highlight of our year and we already can’t wait for next year’s event! We get better at it each year and are so grateful to be able to use our experience in this way. We both KNOW how it feels to BE judged, and neither of forgets that, for even a second, when we are judging. We are happy to report that this year we did the pre-trip on the golf cart and judging lights was accomplished without a breakdown.

One load this summer took me to New York, and while the visit with Roger and Heather was too short, it was better than no visit at all. Any time it works out to spend even a little time with friends is a blessing. You never know what tomorrow may or may not bring. This is one lesson we would dearly LOVE to impart upon each and every one of you, that the people in our lives are what makes our lives worthwhile! If it works out in you travels to see old friends, make the most of it!

We are thankful for little Emma Jean, baby daughter of our friend and driver Brian & Lynda Higbee, who celebrated her 1st birthday this year on April 18th. She wasn’t supposed to even be named, according to her doctors. Her parents were told not to bother because she wasn’t going to make it. Kim got to go and take her 1st birthday pictures! She’s a little miracle girl and we are thankful for her and her family.

2015 has been a great year and we are looking forward to 2016 with great excitement! We want to thank all of you who follow our blog, and ask you to leave us comments. We welcome any ideas about subjects that you would like to see us write about.

Thank you God for the new people you have brought into our lives this year and for all the blessings you give us every day. We join our friends out there reading this in thanking you too, for whatever blessings that have been brought into their lives this year.

We hope that your blessings are many and that you were able to make it home to your families for the holidays, to be with the ones you love and work so hard to support by being gone. Most of all, thank you for helping keep our nation moving.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

All Roads Lead to Walcott

All Roads Lead to Walcott | Trucker Tips
By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

All Roads Lead to Walcott- Every year, the weekend immediately following the 4th of July, Iowa 80 holds their annual “Walcott Truckers Jamboree” which was started by the Moon family 36 years ago as a way to thank the drivers who support them all year long.

Every year, the weekend immediately following the 4th of July, Iowa 80 holds their annual “Walcott Truckers Jamboree” which was started by the Moon family 36 years ago as a way to thank the drivers who support them all year long.

Twenty-five years ago, July 12-13 1990, was the first time I (Kim) ever attended. At that event, I made friends whose friendships I have enjoyed through the years; not to mention that show gave me the ‘bug’ to attend and compete in subsequent truck shows all over the country!

Walcott is also the place where many of us met our dear friend Bette. For those of you who weren’t fortunate enough to have known her, Bette was a renown trucking photojournalist. She could either be found driving her little golf cart “Rooster Cruiser” around the show grounds or perched high up on the scissor lift getting those great shots of the entire show. It was considered a great honor to be asked, by Bette, to take your truck ‘up on the hill’ on Saturday morning for a photo shoot. If that happened, you knew you had truly made it in the show truck world. She looked forward to coming to Iowa every July. Pictures of her work hang on the walls in the chrome shop and in Iowa 80 Group’s corporate office building.

The Jamboree grows every year;  adding events, concerts, fireworks, displays, and vendors. This show truly has something for everyone. It is a fun family event for the drivers who come and bring their wives and kids, the Moon Family has even extended the event from the original two days to three due to its popularity. There are friends that gather at the Jamboree annually, like a family reunion, and that’s just how it feels!

All Roads Lead to Walcott- Every year, the weekend immediately following the 4th of July, Iowa 80 holds their annual “Walcott Truckers Jamboree” which was started by the Moon family 36 years ago as a way to thank the drivers who support them all year long.
Super Trucks Beauty Contest, Walcott Truckers Jamboree 2015

A very popular part of the Jamboree is the Super Truck Beauty Contest; which is always well represented. There are many judged classes for drivers to enter their trucks in. The contest always attracts lots of beautiful trucks. Having so many in one place is truly a sight to behold.

All Roads Lead to Walcott- Every year, the weekend immediately following the 4th of July, Iowa 80 holds their annual “Walcott Truckers Jamboree” which was started by the Moon family 36 years ago as a way to thank the drivers who support them all year long.
Antique trucks on display

There are also antique trucks whose owners form little communities on the event grounds. They get together year after year celebrating their common passion. All of the trucks that are entered in the contest or display in the Antique area, receive either a trophy or a plaque.  Iowa 80 believes that every driver that enters is a winner, the effort every driver puts into getting their equipment ready to show is acknowledged and appreciated.

This year was Heather and my second year as OEM interior judges.  Since not many people know more about this particular class than the two of us, we got invited back! We thoroughly enjoy seeing just what this generation of drivers is doing to jazz up their trucks on the inside and are VERY familiar with what equipment comes with a truck from the factory and what doesn’t. This is the largest class in the show to judge because we need to see both bobtail and combination, but we take it very seriously and do our best to be as fair as possible. We also know how much heart and soul goes into building and showing these rides! It is our honor to do this and we love being able to.

All Roads Lead to Walcott- Every year, the weekend immediately following the 4th of July, Iowa 80 holds their annual “Walcott Truckers Jamboree” which was started by the Moon family 36 years ago as a way to thank the drivers who support them all year long.
Lights at Night, Walcott Truckers Jamboree 2015

Lights at Night is also our pleasure to be able to be a part of judging, along with Paul Ableson and Roger Hogeland and this class is so much FUN! It’s truly beautiful to see but must be done quickly and we all need to agree on the winners. We do this by first selecting those trucks in each class that have the best overall flow.  Then we go over each truck chosen to see more detail and determine which has the most pleasing appeal; which has the best theme front to back and top to bottom; which are the most eye catching; and the best representation for the industry. It is not an easy task, by any means, but necessary; and all are truly winners. It really weighs heavily on us since we know first hand how it feels to be judged. I have always felt it should be a requirement that judges should be retired show truck people, at least some of them, and the Iowa 80 folks agree.

Over the years we have had many fun ways to pass the time, water gun fights standout for me, the second year for those, tanker Dave Marcotte brought ‘ammunition’ in his “Liquid Chicken” tanker. Getting soaked on a hot summer day was so much fun after all of the work involved in getting our trucks ready for competition against some of the best looking trucks on the road.

We have had trucker games over the years that included musical bales, water balloon toss, tire roll, strong pull, tire flip, even pet contests for best tricks and pet beauty contests since so many of us carry our fur babies with us on the road.

If you are a first timer to the Walcott Truckers Jamboree, as I (Heather) was last year, you will find a hospitality that is unrivaled! They throw a drivers’ appreciation event in Iowa like I’ve not seen in my almost 40 years in our industry. Kim has been fortunate to run the I-80 lane so she could come to Walcott weekly, I, on the other hand, lived in Southern California and ran upstate New York, so my lane was more I-40,44,70, etc.,  so it wasn’t until last year that we were able to schedule our first entire visit.

I was very impressed with the entire event, it was the 50th Anniversary of the Iowa 80 Truckstop last year and the Jamboree itself turned 35 so it was a really big year for them, but the Jamboree is a really big event every year. I was able to meet the entire Moon family, and I must tell you, they mean it, THEY APPRECIATE YOU!

The Jamboree began as an appreciation to their customers and that is what it still is. It is the number one purpose for the event, they want to give back to those people who helped them become the World’s Largest Truckstop.

I had such a good time last year that we scheduled the event for this year even before we left the property! Roger and I were lucky enough to be a part of CAT Scale’s Super Truck Limited Edition Collector cards (Series 3 & 5), So we have always been a part of the Iowa 80 family, but now, after going to the Jamboree, we truly FEEL like a part of the family!

All Roads Lead to Walcott- Every year, the weekend immediately following the 4th of July, Iowa 80 holds their annual “Walcott Truckers Jamboree” which was started by the Moon family 36 years ago as a way to thank the drivers who support them all year long.
Audrey Cloutier, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 2016 Kenworth & Wabash trailer “Pinkie”. Took 1st Place for Custom Graphics and 3rd Place for Interior OEM Combo Tractor/Trailer

This year was, again, a blast, even with the rain on Saturday! We made new friends and saw old ones. I got to meet Tamie, Kim’s best friend from high school and we met Audrey Cloutier from Quebec, Canada who runs solo between there and California in her pink W900 Kenworth and matching refer trailer. This event is such fun you truly need to make plans to be there next year, believe me, you won’t be disappointed!  Mark your calendar for July 14-16, 2016.

Stay Safe out There & Keep It Shiny!


 Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.