Category Archives: Winter Tips

Holiday Shopping Guide for Truckers

When looking at your list of loved ones to buy gifts for this holiday season, you may wonder, “What is a good gift for a truck driver?” You might consider snacks, a few good downloads of some favorite songs or a nice looking shirt, but is there anything that might really benefit your loved one on the road? The following are some ideas to consider for the truck driver in your life.
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Winter Driving Essentials for Truck Drivers


Winter can bring a lot of hassles and dangers to truck drivers. As you prepare for winter, there are a few essentials that you should be buying to make trucking in the snow easier and safer. Beyond just reading up on and committing to memory winter driving tips for truckers, you also should consider buying the following items.
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Beating the Winter Blues

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

The nights are longer, the days are shorter and the cold can chill you to the bone! By the time winter is over most people are suffering from cabin (and “cab”) fever. Rather than let it get you down, find ways to beat it and keep you happy ’til April showers bring May flowers and the warmth of summer returns.

If you are fortunate enough to run south in the winter, maybe you can take a me day and find a beach, watch the sun set into the gulf, or the moon come up out of the ocean. Have lunch or dinner at a nice little place overlooking the ocean and listen to the soothing sound of the waves crashing on shore.

If you happen to be in a place like Vero Beach, you can park at the truck stop, call a cab or get an Uber and head to the beach. If you don’t have time for that, just get out of the truck and into the sunshine. It will be just what the doctor would order. Not everyone has the luxury of running Florida or the southern coast states in the winter so you might have to find other ways to have fun and beat those winter blues before they beat you!

A lot of theaters have enough room to park a truck. Get a big tub of popcorn with lots of butter, a big Coke and take in a good movie. Hopefully they have a good comedy playing as they say laughter is the best medicine. Go take a big spoonful!

So many malls won’t let us park there anymore but if you can find one that will you don’t have to spend a lot of money to have a good time. Here you can “mall walk” and get some exercise and when you’re done with that sit down and people watch. I have found that can be quite entertaining. If there are a few things you need to shop for hopefully what you’re looking for is on sale. Sometimes a little retail therapy can go a long way, for women and men!

If a friend’s house happens to be in your flight path stop and visit. I have always liked to stop and see friends when the opportunity presents itself. I make a point to do this even more, we aren’t getting any younger and it seems that so much is happening time spent with friends is priceless.

It is always nice when you can get a hotel room. Get out of the truck, watch TV, order a pizza or Chinese to be delivered and just relax. See if there is something close by worth checking out. Anytime you can take a break, get away from the truck for the night, just get out of there and treat yourself to a ‘mini’ vacation, it will refresh you and give you a new outlook on life. Sometimes, we just need it.

A friend introduced me to K1 Go Kart racing. There are several places across the country where you can do this and boy is it fun. Take out a little frustration and go have a good time! Let’s face it we’re drivers and this is driving for fun as well as a little friendly competition!

Book a spa day where you go and you have a massage (this is a great stress relief). If you’re a lady driver, get a mani/pedi. Maybe be daring and try one of the polishes that change colors when it’s hot or cold. It’s fun and there is nothing wrong with doing something that makes you feel better or pretty.

For the guys, maybe you could stop into a Cabela’s or Bass Pro Shop kind of place and wander around for a bit. Some have a shooting range so you could do a little target practice. Whatever you do make it fun. It’s the best way to beat back the winter blues until spring has sprung!

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Christmas Dinner in the Truck

Christmas Dinner in the Truck | Trucker Tips Blog

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

Thanksgiving is over once again and Christmas is quickly approaching. In our business it’s a fact of life that not everyone gets to make it home for Christmas. Many truck stops have a really nice buffet dinner, but maybe you’d rather make your own dinner. Are you one that wants a more “being at home feel”? We believe being on the road for this holiday is the hardest of all. It’s a time to be with family and the ones you love. If you are able to prepare some of your family favorites, made the way Mom does, it can go a long way to help lift your spirits. You may also want to put up some festive decorations and colorful lights in your truck to keep your mood cheerful when forced to be away from home during the holidays.

thanksgiving_turkey_500pxUnless you have the luxury of a big bunk with an oven, you probably won’t be able to cook an entire turkey, but a bone-in turkey breast a great option instead. There are a variety of 12-volt cookers available these days. Back in the day, we had an inverter and I used a rectangular metal crock pot with a small little griddle at its base to make our turkey. The drippings from that I put into a small pan to make gravy. Microwave a couple of potatoes and mash them up. If you want a healthy version of mashed potatoes, try cauliflower! Bake it and mash it the same as you would potatoes. Sweet potatoes are another healthier option, unless you add the brown sugar and marshmallows to make them extra yummy. I say, “Go for it. It’s Christmas after all!” I’ve said this before, but lunchbox cookers with foil pan liners work great for cooking, including sweet potato casserole. They make clean up easy. You simply throw out the pan when done!

Christmas Dinner in the Truck | Trucker Tips Blog

The traditional favorite green bean casserole also cooks great using the lunchbox style cooker. Open a can of french cut green beans, drain them, put contents in a foil liner. Add a can of cream of mushroom soup, stir together and top with crispy fried onions, and cook until bubbling. If that’s not possible, warm up your favorite veggie and make the best of it. It’s still cooking at home. Cranberry sauce is another one of my favorites. It makes no difference if it’s right out of the can, from the deli or homemade! It’s a necessity with turkey and a requirement for a homemade feel to your Christmas dinner.

If you can’t cook everything yourself, the deli case at a nearby grocery store might be a good way to get a lot of variety without a lot of leftovers; especially if you don’t have much room. Maybe a new salad could be added to your list of favorites for the holiday dinner. A cabbage salad, ambrosia or other fruit salad is always a great addition to any holiday meal and you can usually find these in most delis.
We can’t forget dessert! Many stores and many truck stops have bakeries, so you can probably find your favorite pie or cake by the slice. You do have options! Many times all you have to do is ask. Also, if you get to go home before the holiday, maybe you can bring some of your favorite treats from home back out on the road with you. It is always fun to talk with other drivers too and see what some of their favorite treats and traditions are. It’s a great way to connect with others and also keep your spirits up during the holidays.

Speaking of favorites and traditions; I would like to share a southern tradition with you that happens to be one of my favorites. For southerners, this is quite possibly the most important meal of the year. We always followed this particular menu, once Roger introduced me to it. He was born and raised in Alabama. I was from southern California; a different kind of southern. He taught me the practice of eating black eyed peas, hog jowls, greens and cornbread every year on the 1st of January. It CAN be done on the truck, either with canned peas and greens and deli ham and corn muffins or slow cooker made black eyed peas with chunked pork and greens on the side in your choice of cooker. You can buy, bake or fry the cornbread. The point here is that you take part in the tradition. The belief is that the peas represent luck, the pork is for health, greens for dollars, and cornbread for gold. The more of each you eat, the more of each you will have in the New Year!

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Chain Up!

Chain Up! Winter Driving Tips for Semi Trucks | Trucker Tips Blog

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

Ready or not, winter is here! If you run out west you had better be prepared to meet the requirements of the western states when it comes to snow chains. Even if you are stopped on a nice sunny day with no hint of snow in the forecast, you could still be at risk of getting a ticket for not carrying the proper amount of chains for the truck you are driving. It is extremely important that you familiarize yourself with the requirements for EACH state law regarding chains BEFORE you enter that state. Unfortunately, the laws are not the same from state to state, so getting the information ahead of time is crucial.

We recommend finding out which state has the strictest law and carry the maximum chains you will need, weight allowing. This way you will always be compliant. Another thing to check on, and be sure of, are the dates of requirement which can differ from state to state. For instance, Georgia now has a chain law as a result of all of the wrecks they’ve had in recent winter storms. Again, it’s important to look at the law in ALL states where you run.

When the chain law signs go up, you had better be prepared to hang “iron” or hire some of the people who sit at chain up areas to hang chains for you. If you don’t, you certainly aren’t going anywhere! Make sure that you know your company’s policy about chaining up or parking when the road conditions get to this point. Many companies will allow you to run around a severe winter storm or blizzard, which is the ideal situation. However if they don’t, you need to have the knowledge to keep yourself safe.

Before you find yourself in a situation where you need to put chains on your tires, it would be a good idea to find a place and practice putting them on your wheels. Standing in the cold and snow with drivers splashing you with yuck off the road is not the time to be figuring this out.

Make sure that you have plenty of bungee cords or spider bungees to help secure the chains once they are on. Time and travel on rough snowy roads can and will loosen them, so pay attention in your mirrors. It’s nice if you have a chain hanger under your trailer or on the frame of your truck so that you can hang wet sloppy chains up and not let them freeze in a big lump inside your tool box.

It’s a good idea to check your tires after running chains. Even if your chains didn’t break, other trucks will probably have one break and a broken link in a tire means a trip to the tire shop for repair. I would never have guessed this if a friend hadn’t told me (after learning the hard way).

Sometimes chains can help you even if there isn’t a chain law in effect. For instance, if the road is icy and you have to stop for an accident on an incline, chains might be the only way you are going to be able to get going again. Sometimes after a really big snow it can take truck stops awhile to get everything plowed, especially with all of the trucks in the lot. In a case like that chains or a shovel are going to be your only way out. Another good idea, one we ALWAYS do during winter months, is to carry a bag of sand, salt or kitty litter to help you get enough traction to get going. Be prepared – it may just save your life one winter day!

Remember to SLOW DOWN in inclement weather. Nothing will help you avoid disaster better than a slower speed! We have to keep a sharp eye out at all times for new drivers; 4-wheeler and 18-wheeler alike. For some, this could very well be their first ever winter driving experience. We need to be driving our trucks for them, as well as for ourselves, to keep everyone safe. It is our responsibility as the professionals out here to stay calm and behave as such. We can lead by example and do our best to keep the accident statistics down this winter.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Winter Wellness

Winter Wellness- The cold, dry air of winter is hard, not only on your truck, but on you and on your skin as well. You need to bundle up when the cold temperatures are hovering outdoors! Staying warm; keeping your core temperature up becomes a priority.

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

The cold, dry air of winter is hard, not only on your truck, but on you and on your skin as well. You need to bundle up when the cold temperatures are hovering outdoors! Staying warm; keeping your core temperature up becomes a priority.

It’s important to remember to wear gloves or mittens to protect your fingers and hands and to wrap a winter scarf around your neck and face. When it’s very cold outside having a scarf covering your nose and mouth will help tremendously because it will filter the air you breathe in,  warming it before it enters your airways.

Whenever you are going to be out in the cold for any length of time wearing a stocking hat that keeps your head and ears covered is a necessity since we lose most of our body heat through our heads.

It doesn’t take long to get frostbite on fingers and toes, and, if it’s extreme enough, you could lose some of those digits. So, make sure you have heavy socks and good winter boots, along with a pair of warm insulated coveralls included with your regular wardrobe during the winter months.

As our dear friend Bette Garber always used to tell us, moisturize, moisturize, moisturize! Keeping your skin hydrated is important, using a good moisturizer is a necessity for men and women, especially at this time of year when cold temperatures cause all of the moisture to disappear from the atmosphere. Get, and use, a good ChapStick for your lips as they are almost always exposed and dry out easily.

You still need to use sunscreen, just like it was summer, maybe even more so. In winter the UV rays have less contaminants in the atmosphere to block them, so even though the days are shorter, the harmful rays are still shining down and the reflective effect off the snow is dangerous.

Another winter tip we use but often forget to mention is saline spray for nasal passages. Doing what we do, traveling through climate changes and altitude differences daily, one of the things we can experience is sinus pressure. We have found that carrying a bottle of saline spray mist is a very useful tool that helps tremendously to relieve the pressure buildup and headache that oftentimes accompanies the pressure. The problem is created due to the drying out of the nasal passages, using the saline mist puts moisture back into those areas.

We have also noticed that there are even snow chains available that you can get to “chain up” your shoes. These studded shoe covers can be a lifesaver when it gets icy out! A slip on the ice could be devastating to you physically, emotionally, as well as financially if it resulted in an injury that prevented you from working for weeks or months. The recovery time for an event like that could crush a family, so take care!

The basic winter checklist should still apply here:

  • Winter clothing: coats, boots, hats, gloves, extra clothing
  • Sweatshirts, insulated pants, thermals, layer clothing
  • Extra blankets or comforters/throws
  • Food, peanut butter & crackers, tuna fish packets, granola bars
  • Bottle water!!
  • Fresh batteries & flashlight
  • Rock salt to help if you get stuck to the road surface
  • Pet Parents – Remember to pack plenty of food & bottle water for your fur baby!

Speaking of pets, don’t forget them when the temperatures plummet! Have a coat and boots for them and use a warm, dry towel to dry them off as soon as they get back in the truck. Be sure to carry plenty of bottled water for them so you can be sure of what they’re drinking. Keep plenty of food onboard, you never know when or where you might get snowed in.

Lastly, always keep your fuel tanks at half full or higher whenever the weather forecast looks ugly! You never know when you may need that extra fuel to last due to a road closure! It’s ALWAYS better to be prepared and safe.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Home for the Holidays

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

Home for the Holidays- This is the time of year when many drivers are trying to get home to spend time with their families over the holidays.  Drivers who run with their significant others, or drivers who do not have family to go home to, will often times stay out on the road to give drivers who do have small children or family an opportunity to spend the holidays at home.

This is the time of year when many drivers are trying to get home to spend time with their families over the holidays.  Drivers who run with their significant others, or drivers who do not have family to go home to, will often times stay out on the road to give drivers who do have small children or family an opportunity to spend the holidays at home.

We have a few hints for you before going home for the holidays.  If possible, get all your laundry done ahead of time so to free up precious home time you could be using for activities with your family that are a lot more fun.  Those moments are precious and you can never get them back!  If you are at all like we are and take the opportunity to shop on the road, (being an OTR driver affords us opportunities to buy such unique gifts!) take the time to wrap those presents.  We both carried the wrapping supplies with us so that whenever we had a little down time we could get that out of the way.  It will be one less thing to do at home and you’ll be ready to take them in the house and slip them under the tree.  Get creative in hauling them in your sleeper, it will help get you into the Christmas spirit as well save more of the time you want to spend visiting with the people that you love.  We used our top bunks for storage, put rectangular laundry baskets up there.  They ride well and make great organizers plus, they are awesome for hauling more than just laundry from truck to house and vice versa!

Home for the Holidays- This is the time of year when many drivers are trying to get home to spend time with their families over the holidays.  Drivers who run with their significant others, or drivers who do not have family to go home to, will often times stay out on the road to give drivers who do have small children or family an opportunity to spend the holidays at home.I’ve been reading a lot of Facebook posts recently about the kind things drivers are doing while at home to help other drivers who are not as fortunate.  Some took homemade Thanksgiving dinners to local truck stops and distributed them to the drivers who were sitting there.  My mom always asked us to go to the truck stop, and if anyone we knew might be in town, bring them home for the holiday.  She couldn’t stand for any driver to be lonely.  Others would bake pies and take them to share a piece of homemade pumpkin or apple pie with the drivers.  I think this is a wonderful idea, at Christmas maybe you could come up with a new family tradition that would involve wrapping a few small gifts and doing the same sort of thing?  Maybe go to the truck stop and give a few drivers a present to open on Christmas?  There are many little things we could do to show drivers that we appreciate their hard work, a small stocking stuffed with some fruit and nuts would be very sweet and well received by a lonely driver far from home during the holidays.

I think any driver who is just starting out has to, many times, work through a major holiday or two, so, even if we get to go home this year, we need to remember that it wasn’t always so.  Roger and I always worked through Thanksgiving so that we could be home for Christmas, but even then we took the very first load after Christmas.  SOMEBODY has to.  The freight must move.

BUT, while you are at home, get in the spirit and enjoy your time at home with your family!  Bundle up and go out to see the Christmas lights with someone you love, take them out for hot cocoa afterwards.  Pop popcorn and string it with cranberries to make a garland for the tree or use it elsewhere, almost no-one does that anymore!  Take the time to teach these things to the younger generations, show them how to make a snow angel, make a snowman together using a carrot for a nose, sticks for his arms and the whole deal.  Make it a fun memory!  We all work really hard all year long and every driver deserves a break to have some fun and make some memories with the people they love!

Merry Christmas and have a Safe and Happy New Year!

Home for the Holidays- This is the time of year when many drivers are trying to get home to spend time with their families over the holidays.  Drivers who run with their significant others, or drivers who do not have family to go home to, will often times stay out on the road to give drivers who do have small children or family an opportunity to spend the holidays at home.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Pack for Winter

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

Pack for Winter- The temperatures are tumbling and, even though a lot of us dread the thought that snow will be falling soon, we realize that the time is NOW to prepare ourselves and our trucks for the freezing temperatures. The heat and humidity of summer is one thing but the below zero temperatures and wind chills of winter can turn deadly in a hurry if you are caught unprepared.The temperatures are tumbling and, even though a lot of us dread the thought that snow will be falling soon, we realize that the time is NOW to prepare ourselves and our trucks for the freezing temperatures. The heat and humidity of summer is one thing but the below zero temperatures and wind chills of winter can turn deadly in a hurry if you are caught unprepared.

Even for the old pros, it’s a good idea to make a list and get the proper equipment back in your truck before you might need it.  Starting with winter gear for yourself.  If you have a furry companion, they should have a warm coat along too in case you happen to have a break down and the warm truck turns frigid inside.

Start with the basics: winter coats, winter boots, gloves or mittens, scarves or face masks, thermal underclothes, stocking hats, caps, insulated coveralls and warm clothes such as sweatshirts and insulated jeans, (snow pants are warm and are more water resistant.)  Dress in layers,  it will help keep you warmer longer and as it warms up you can start peeling off layers. Don’t forget the extra blankets or comforters for your sleeper as well, an extra throw or two wouldn’t hurt!

If you run west many states now require snow chains by September 1, snow can fall in the mountains early in the fall and last late into the spring.  If you run these states ignorance is no excuse and the fines can be severe for not having enough chains on board.  Check the minimum requirements for the states you are going to be running through and make sure you have enough.

The first freeze of the season is a learning experience for every driver after the reprieve of summer. Getting the feel of how your rig is going to handle is best done by slowing down when the snow starts coming down and the temperature drops. Last year there were way too many wrecks involving trucks that were going too fast and following too close for conditions. We really don’t want to see a repeat of that this year! We want to urge everyone to PLEASE, take it easy, keep a safe following distance and take your time. We want all of you to arrive safely at your destination.

Be sure you have plenty of food. Every year it seems there are pictures on the news of drivers sharing food with other stranded motorists somewhere in the country. Also make sure you have plenty of water or some way to melt clean snow to drink. Some staples like peanut butter and crackers, tuna fish packets and granola bars can all provide nourishment and help you keep warm even if you were to lose power for a time.

You need to be sure to have plenty of fresh batteries for a flashlight that might one day be needed to signal for help along with some rock salt that could be used to help you get unstuck if you were to find yourself suddenly frozen to the asphalt.

Use a checklist, one you’ve developed over the years. Based on where you drive, you know what you do and don’t need in the truck. Personally, we choose to live by the mantra that we’d rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it, so we tend to pack much more in the winter than in the summer. Believe it or not we have both had those times throughout the years where we have needed almost every single item we have listed. So pack it up and keep warm this winter.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Winter Preparedness

What You Need To Know

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

As temperatures plummet you have to be prepared for potentially life threatening conditions. The brutal cold is hard on equipment and can cause it to break down leaving you without heat for hours, or force a road to close leaving you in the same spot for hours, even days at times.

Winter Preparedness- As temperatures plummet you have to be prepared for potentially life threatening conditions. The brutal cold is hard on equipment and can cause it to break down leaving you without heat for hours, or force a road to close leaving you in the same spot for hours, even days at times.

1.  It is essential you keep your fuel tanks filled above a half tank as you do not want to be stranded with the gauge approaching empty. You should always carry a spare fuel filter and filter wrench remembering that, if necessary, you MUST fill the filter with fuel before putting it on.

2.  Watch for spray coming off tires, both your own and that of others as this is a good indicator of the iciness of the road. Even if there is spray the road can still be freezing up, especially on bridges and areas where wind is more constant, so be cautious and look at oncoming traffic, see how much snow and ice is building up on their grills and landing gear. Where they are coming from is where you are headed, pay attention, you can learn a lot. The only way to learn to drive in those conditions is to do it but if the oncoming traffic is getting less and less, it might just be time to find a safe place to park. IF it becomes necessary to park remember NOT to set your trailer brakes right away, give them time to cool down first, otherwise the melted snow and ice will refreeze causing the brake shoes to freeze to the drums.

3.  When the time comes to stop on a slick road, if you gently pull down on your trailer brake before applying gentle, steady pressure on your foot pedal, you will have allowed the air to travel through the system and reach the farthest brakes first thereby allowing you to come to a straight stop instead of jack knifing. Getting into this habit will serve you well over the years for any panic stop on icy roads. Believe me, we know.

4.  Make sure your radiator is full of antifreeze, if your heater seems to be blowing cold air it could be because it is running low. Topping this off may be all it takes to fix it.

5.  The newer LED lights are brighter and much easier to see but they burn much cooler so they don’t melt snow, be sure you go back and wipe off all your lights and turn signals often so you can be clearly seen from behind.

6.  We have a “winter carry list” of necessities that we always pack at this time of year and we are going to share it here with you now. It includes for the truck:

  • A gallon or 2 of antifreeze windshield washer fluid (It’s very hard to keep the windshield clean when it’s snowing and traffic is slinging slush, truck-stops sell out of this very quickly)
  • A Good hammer (to beat on the brake drums if frozen to the shoes DON’T BEAT THE SHOES)
  • Rubbing alcohol (it can be poured into air lines at the glad hands when frozen, alcohol dissipates water/ice so brakes can be released)
  • Carry a bag of rock salt (when you are stopped or parked you may/will get frozen to the ground, this will melt the ice so you can move when ready)
  • If your key won’t turn in the lock, rub it, repeatedly, put it in and out of the lock and turn it back and forth and repeat until it turns. It will work, if you are patient.

7.  For yourself, keeping warm is important, make sure you have clothes for the conditions: Insulated coveralls, good winter boots, gloves, socks, hats, scarves, blankets, hand warmers, bunk warmer, huge pillar candles can provide a little heat if the truck shuts down. Have your flashlights and extra chargers all with new batteries and keep a stocked first aid kit. If you are prepared for the worst you’ll probably never have to face it. At least that’s our sincerest hope for you all!

Stay safe out there and keep it shiny!


hogeland_grimm_149x149 Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.