Category Archives: Business Tips

5 Benefits of Using AutoSock as Your Winter Traction Aid


With brutal winter conditions possible in many parts of the country, drivers need to be prepared. That goes double for commercial truck drivers powering through bad weather over both short and long distances., Snow tire chains have been a classic vehicle accessory for driving in ice and snow, but AutoSock is an innovative traction solution that prevents spinning tires, wheel slippage, fishtailing and other weather-related road hazards. AutoSocks for trucks is an efficient and safer alternative to tire chains, offering five unique benefits for owner-operators, drivers and fleet managers.
Continue reading 5 Benefits of Using AutoSock as Your Winter Traction Aid

ELDs

Are You Ready?

By Larry Pruitt

With the FMCSA‘s Electronic Logging Device Mandate deadline quickly looming, Owner-Operators and small fleet owners alike are trying to wade through all of their options for the upcoming mandate deadline.  They’re trying to decide what will work best for them.  I know some companies have been testing different products on some select trucks in their fleet, while other operations are holding out hope that there will be a stay at the eleventh hour.  In my opinion, Congress doesn’t seem to agree on anything these days and unable to get anything passed, so I seriously doubt that this will get stopped before December 18.

With that being said, there is a very large contingent of drivers that have made the statement that they are leaving the industry when this mandate takes effect.  Some may leave and will probably move on to other careers, but most will continue on and adapt to the mandate. This upheaval in the industry will subside, and as my Mom would say, “This too shall pass”, and I agree with her, “This too will pass… it may pass like a kidney stone, but it will pass”.  I’m old enough to remember back in the late-eighties or early-nineties when the CDL License Program was being introduced into the Trucking Industry.  There was a large number of drivers that were afraid that the CDL process would be so complicated that there was going to be a large shortage of drivers.  Drivers were going to leave the industry in droves because of something that today is viewed as no big deal and just part of the process of the regulations that we are saddled with today.

I’m not going to try to change anybody’s mind here on whether you want ELDs or don’t want them.  I’m just going to pass on my experiences, as I switched over to an ELD a little over a month ago.

To give you a little bit of background, I’ve been doing my logs on a tablet for the past 5 years or so using the Big Road app. I found that my logs were much easier to make sure that they were filled out completely and most of all, correctly.  This helps ensure you have a lesser chance to fall victim to a form and matter violation at a roadside inspection. The app would not let you sign your log unless everything was filled out properly.  I installed the connection to ECM back in September using the same app Big Road app.  I chose this product for a couple of different reasons, one was that I already was familiar with the app and the other was that I had good luck with tech support previously.  I wanted to get acclimated to using an ELD now versus trying to get compliant in the middle of December and having trouble.

The process of switching over has been pretty much uneventful so far.  I haven’t been caught about to run out of hours in my day yet, but I’m sure that will happen eventually.  I’m very fortunate that my operation allows me to be home every night.  I will admit that e-logs make it easier to keep track of duty status changes, it automatically knows when you start driving and when you stop driving, so you don’t even have to look at it for the biggest part of the day.  I will go back into it later and add notes to my stops whenever I have the time.

I think that ELDs are going to affect the industry over the foreseeable future.  I think that changes are going to be just as hard on shippers and receivers.  The truck lines are going to force shippers to get their trucks in and out and back on the road.  Let’s face it, companies are not going to be able to let trucks sit at a shipper or receiver for roughly 8 hours and then only have 6 hours left for their day and still be able to make any profit whatsoever.  Shippers will have to get better or their freight will lay on their dock, because no one will waste their time with that shipper.  I can see more drop and hook freight in the future, in segments that have never before been drop and hook operations.

One thing is for sure, the small fleet folks may have to change how they do business.  I think most small carriers will be able to adapt if they approach this from working within the system rather than trying to work around the system.

Well, that’s my opinion and experiences on the ELD mandate.  There are folks that agree with me and most definitely some that do not agree with me but are very passionate about their opinion.  No matter what anyone’s opinion is, let’s revisit this issue in about a year or so and see what the industry and it’s logging issues are at that time.  To everyone involved, GOOD LUCK with the mandate!

Iowa80.com offers a variety of e-log devices, shop here.


Larry Pruitt is an owner-operator with over 20 years of experience and has been involved in trucking for close to 40 years. He is a firefighter in North St. Louis County Missouri and resides with his wife, Jeanette, in Saint Clair, MO.


 

Pride in Your Ride

Personalize a New-To-You Rig

By John L. Hruska

Through the years, I have bought many new and used trucks. I always seem to want to personalize these trucks to fit not only our company, but the driver too. All it takes to show pride in your ride is some good looking chrome and creature comforts.

When I buy a used truck, sometimes the truck is in good overall condition, but maybe the interior is worn some along with the outside parts. Here are some ideas on how I look at refurbishing a used truck that’s in good working order but might need some TLC.

Let’s start with the interior. First, give it a really good deep cleaning, then assess what’s needed. The carpet or rubber flooring is typically worn, so I will pull out both seats and replace it with new pieces. If the seats are worn too, this is a good time to replace them as well because it’ll save you some labor later. New rug or floor mat and seats make a huge difference for the driver of the truck; more comfort, less road noise, and definitely a better look inside.

The next thing is something with the dash. I like to give the dash a little “bling” with some chrome or color that match the trucks color. You can get toggle switch covers, dash layovers, parking brake knobs, or even a gearshift knob handle with a chrome extension. If you do all (or even some) of these things, you start to get a cool look that all comes together with some color and chrome.

Next, get some air fresheners color matched to your interior in a scent that you like, and your interior starts feeling more like home and less like the generic used truck you just got off the lot. These small changes give your driver a good start to a pretty cool interior that you can be proud of. It’ll make the driver more productive and certainly helps him or her to feel more comfortable going down the highway.

2014 Kenworth W900L

Now for the exterior. After another really good deep cleaning, assess the outside and determine what you’d like. I typically will have a truck detailed or repainted and then I decide what’s going to make the truck pop and be a little different. First, I always trim all the wheels and all lug nuts with chrome covers and axle covers. Iowa 80 has great selection of these to choose from whatever is your preference or style.

Next is the mud flaps. New, matching flaps always look better and also shows the DOT that you care about what you’re doing. Make sure they’re nice and neat, not upside down and different lengths with scattered holes in them. Now you’re starting to pull the outside together. Maybe add some chrome flap weights, to bring out your new flaps with style.

I like to add some extra lights as well, but be careful – too much and the truck is junked up, not enough then it looks like a fleet truck. Try to find the balance of lights that you like, then use them in an equal series on each side and keep them symmetrical on front and back. Sometimes it helps to look at some other trucks and find what you like. I even take photos of trucks that I like so I can keep the ideas to do a truck later. LED lights are always a better alternative that incandescent lights, they have a longer life and usually a better warranty.

Next, add some more shine with a drop visor, if that’s your thing, or maybe some stainless half fenders. I always fill in behind the sleeper with at least one frame mounted aluminum step box. It is a great tool, very durable, and you’ll always have room for an extra gallon of oil or antifreeze. And I don’t have to worry about the drivers putting those items in the sleeper compartments to make a mess.

2014 Kenworth W900L

Ok, now you have a great start in making your newly purchased truck your own. Keep thinking of new ideas to keep your truck looking good and use accessories to set yourself apart from the crowd. Don’t forget! – The folks at Iowa 80 will always be there for you with phone support to help you find all those parts and accessories that you need to bring some pride and style to your truck.

Keep pride in your ride!!


hruska_149x149John’s father started in the trucking business in 1947, John then joined the business in 1981. He owns and operates Hruska Trucking and Diesel Transport along with his business partner and brother-in-law, Clark D Hofecker, in Windber, PA.


 

Growing a Small Fleet

 

When is it Time to Add A Truck?

By John L. Hruska

 

When trying to grow your business or add a truck there are a few key things to think about. First, do you have the cash or at least some money to fund this growth? Second, do you have the additional work for the truck that you’re adding? Third, do you have another qualified driver in mind for this truck? Lastly, do you yourself have the extra time to manage another truck and driver?

In my opinion there are only a few good reasons to add a truck. 1) Dedicated profitable work that’s growing and you don’t want to miss the opportunity, 2) You know a very good driver that would fit well into your operation, and 3) The company you’re signed on with is growing and they have asked you to add another truck and driver because they like your service.

Here’s a reason to not buy a truck. Never buy a truck solely for a tax deduction. This is not a good enough reason to purchase more equipment. If you need more deductions, talk to an accountant to find out how to get some different tax breaks with your business without having to buy another truck.

Let’s start with the cash, if you’re going to put another unit on the road it’s my opinion you should have at least $12,000 to $15,000 set aside for operating expenses. I don’t mean an extra loan or a line of credit, I mean cash. This should be in addition to your down deposit money on the truck that you purchase. Keep in mind that if you’re adding a truck you will need to get through at least the first few weeks to a month of expenses before you see any money from that truck. Some of the things to think about are as follows: fuel costs, driver’s wages, your first truck payment, truck insurance, license, permits, and don’t forget repairs or upfits for road readiness.

If you purchase a new truck, the extra cash for upfits such as pumps or blowers can sometimes be financed along with your truck loan, but don’t forget if you get a higher interest rate on your truck financing you are now paying interest on your accessories too. And if they break before you pay off your truck, you have a payment on parts that you’re not even using anymore.

If you buy a used truck, review what it will take to get it road ready with your dealer. Remember, no incoming money for a month or two, and you don’t want to use your cash for breakdowns or truck readiness. Try to include into your purchase price things like all new tires, or maybe new brakes and drums, or even all new fluids in motor and drive train. Have the dealer fix any oil leaks or issues that you might see; maybe even add a fresh bumper. Look the truck over very well and take your time in doing this. Be choosy on which truck you purchase. Ask for oil samples or past engine and component history. Becoming educated on the truck purchase will help you get through the early weeks without any surprises.

Now it’s time to put your driver in the seat. Hopefully you have a good qualified candidate, but understand he’s working for you. So, he or she will need your support and respect. You need to give this person the proper tools to make this new truck and your business succeed. Make sure the driver has things like expense cash for tolls or incidentals, fuel cards, and a cell phone. It is imperative that your driver can talk to you when they need you. Don’t leave your driver hanging to make an important decision without you.  They need your full support. Make sure the driver understands that proper communication is the key to a good working relationship.

Now let’s look at extra time in your work day. Sometimes we don’t think about the time that it takes to manage additional trucks or drivers. Do you have the time to manage another driver and truck? This is something you need to give some thought to. Drivers are employees, they can’t make major decisions on their own, and you shouldn’t expect them to. If a driver is calling, you need to answer the phone. Maybe it’s about a load they should take or a breakdown, or even a question like, “should I use the toll road or not?” These are calls you must answer. You need to help them with their job to make these decisions.

Do you do your own mechanical work? If so, then you’re now working on two trucks instead of one. This can sometimes make the weekend pretty short when your significant other or kids want to go on a summer picnic or to a ball game. Don’t forget about the extra paperwork, billing, fuel receipts, all the things you do with your truck is multiplied by two.

In closing, adding a truck for the right reasons can be a very positive thing. If you think it through, manage it correctly, and use some of the ideas that I mentioned, you can be more profitable and have a greater presence with your customer or company that you work with.

 


 


hruska_149x149John’s father started in the trucking business in 1947, John then joined the business in 1981. He owns and operates Hruska Trucking and Diesel Transport along with his business partner and brother-in-law, Clark D Hofecker, in Windber, PA.


 

Maintenance Records

By John L. Hruska

When owning trucks and trailers, the expense of proper repairs and upkeep can be overwhelming, I’ve found that keeping good maintenance records is a key to healthy, profitable equipment.

Maintenance Records- When owning trucks and trailers, the expense of proper repairs and upkeep can be overwhelming, I've found that keeping good maintenance records is a key to healthy, profitable equipment.
My Kenworth W900L

First and foremost, come up with a plan on how to format your maintenance records and how to keep them neat and legible. I typically use a spreadsheet with separate columns for date, mileage and repairs performed. If you don’t have a computer you can always use a hard back ledger book from an office supply store. Once you have this, separate the file or book into different categories. The categories that I use are as follows: General Repairs, Filters, Suspension, Air System, Tires, Wheel Ends, Electrical, Hoses and Belts, AC / Heater, and Major Components. Keeping your maintenance records organized makes it easier to have them readily available when you need them.

Now that you have a place to record your repairs, you’ve taken the first step to better maintenance. When repairs are performed, enter the date, mileage, what repairs and parts have been replaced and who did the work. It’s also important to record where you purchased the new parts. A new part typically carries some sort of warranty (check with your dealer). If the part fails, your dealer should stand behind it for a period of time. It’s also a good idea to keep your sales receipt. Your receipt can prove when you bought the part and can be the difference between paying again or getting a new one under warranty. Warranty parts are always a good thing, we don’t pay for them.

As time goes by, your records will prove to be a great tool. After a few repairs you can look back on different parts like brake lining, tires, or even brake drums. At this point you can do a little of your own analysis, like calculating the cost per mile on your part. To do this, take the price of the part and divide it by the number of miles that you used that part for. Now you can realize what your cost per mile is on that particular part. Sometimes you will find that a cheaper, up front cost is not always the cheapest overall cost in the long term.

Good maintenance records are always a big plus when you’re ready to sell your truck as well. When a prospective buyer or dealer gets a look at the past few years of your trucks repair history this helps you to get a better trade or sale price for your truck.

Lastly, I think it is also important to keep a copy of regular oil analysis in your record file. In my opinion oil sampling, also called oil analysis, can be a very valuable piece of information to have. It is like blood work for your engine; if you do this on a regular basis you can see the trends of wear metals, carbons and soots. You can also catch a potential failure such as water or fuel in your oil, which can be very harmful to your engine if not caught early.

spreadsheet_1
Snapshot of my maintenance records spreadsheet. Notice the tabs at the bottom for part numbers, repairs, suspension, etc.

To sum it up, good maintenance records are one of the most valuable tools on your work bench. They can help you to see the true cost of the parts and services that you purchase. If used correctly, good maintenance records can save you money and help you to take better care of your asset.


hruska_149x149John’s father started in the trucking business in 1947, John then joined the business in 1981.  He owns and operates Hruska Trucking and Diesel Transport along with his business partner and brother-in-law, Clark D Hofecker, in Windber, PA.


 

Winter Wellness

Winter Wellness- The cold, dry air of winter is hard, not only on your truck, but on you and on your skin as well. You need to bundle up when the cold temperatures are hovering outdoors! Staying warm; keeping your core temperature up becomes a priority.

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

The cold, dry air of winter is hard, not only on your truck, but on you and on your skin as well. You need to bundle up when the cold temperatures are hovering outdoors! Staying warm; keeping your core temperature up becomes a priority.

It’s important to remember to wear gloves or mittens to protect your fingers and hands and to wrap a winter scarf around your neck and face. When it’s very cold outside having a scarf covering your nose and mouth will help tremendously because it will filter the air you breathe in,  warming it before it enters your airways.

Whenever you are going to be out in the cold for any length of time wearing a stocking hat that keeps your head and ears covered is a necessity since we lose most of our body heat through our heads.

It doesn’t take long to get frostbite on fingers and toes, and, if it’s extreme enough, you could lose some of those digits. So, make sure you have heavy socks and good winter boots, along with a pair of warm insulated coveralls included with your regular wardrobe during the winter months.

As our dear friend Bette Garber always used to tell us, moisturize, moisturize, moisturize! Keeping your skin hydrated is important, using a good moisturizer is a necessity for men and women, especially at this time of year when cold temperatures cause all of the moisture to disappear from the atmosphere. Get, and use, a good ChapStick for your lips as they are almost always exposed and dry out easily.

You still need to use sunscreen, just like it was summer, maybe even more so. In winter the UV rays have less contaminants in the atmosphere to block them, so even though the days are shorter, the harmful rays are still shining down and the reflective effect off the snow is dangerous.

Another winter tip we use but often forget to mention is saline spray for nasal passages. Doing what we do, traveling through climate changes and altitude differences daily, one of the things we can experience is sinus pressure. We have found that carrying a bottle of saline spray mist is a very useful tool that helps tremendously to relieve the pressure buildup and headache that oftentimes accompanies the pressure. The problem is created due to the drying out of the nasal passages, using the saline mist puts moisture back into those areas.

We have also noticed that there are even snow chains available that you can get to “chain up” your shoes. These studded shoe covers can be a lifesaver when it gets icy out! A slip on the ice could be devastating to you physically, emotionally, as well as financially if it resulted in an injury that prevented you from working for weeks or months. The recovery time for an event like that could crush a family, so take care!

The basic winter checklist should still apply here:

  • Winter clothing: coats, boots, hats, gloves, extra clothing
  • Sweatshirts, insulated pants, thermals, layer clothing
  • Extra blankets or comforters/throws
  • Food, peanut butter & crackers, tuna fish packets, granola bars
  • Bottle water!!
  • Fresh batteries & flashlight
  • Rock salt to help if you get stuck to the road surface
  • Pet Parents – Remember to pack plenty of food & bottle water for your fur baby!

Speaking of pets, don’t forget them when the temperatures plummet! Have a coat and boots for them and use a warm, dry towel to dry them off as soon as they get back in the truck. Be sure to carry plenty of bottled water for them so you can be sure of what they’re drinking. Keep plenty of food onboard, you never know when or where you might get snowed in.

Lastly, always keep your fuel tanks at half full or higher whenever the weather forecast looks ugly! You never know when you may need that extra fuel to last due to a road closure! It’s ALWAYS better to be prepared and safe.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Getting Things in Order

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

Most of us don’t like to talk about the day we will no longer be on this planet, but for all drivers, ESPECIALLY those drivers with families, there are some very serious things you Getting Things in Order- Most of us don't like to talk about the day we will no longer be on this planet, but for all drivers, ESPECIALLY those drivers with families, there are some very serious things you really need to think about.really need to think about.

It’s not the happiest of topics, but none is more important! It seems to so many of us that there’s always time to take care of these matters, we have a real reluctance to deal with these issues because the mere thought of our death seems so absurd. We need to get past that and get our stuff together. Not a single one of us can come back after the fact and fix it once we’re gone. If you get sick and know the time is coming sooner than expected, you may be able to put things in order. However, if you are young and healthy you tend to think “it won’t happen to me”. Sadly though, sometimes it does.

Drivers of all ages have a responsibility to those at home to take care of business, which includes the future of the family, not just the present. Being on the road can be dangerous, in fact truck driving consistently rates on the Top 10 list of most dangerous jobs in America. So we really need to take this seriously, as well as our jobs. It can happen to the very best of us; no matter how many safe miles we have behind us. You need to be like a Boy Scout and “Be Prepared”, just in case. As you know, we are not the only drivers on the road and can only control how we drive, not how others do. We’ve all seen completely crazy tailgating, distracted driving, and don’t get us started on being cut-off!

There are things you should have in place, even if you are not a driver. If you have young children, do you have a guardian in mind? Someone you have spoken with who has agreed to take on the responsibility of raising them in case of your absence? Of course this means in the case of the loss of the other parent as well, but this must be addressed. You need to make your wishes known. You need to have these wishes written down and witnessed, at the very least, along with your wishes regarding a living will, advance directive, power of attorney, and organ donation, then signed and notarized. As soon as you can, you need to get the legal documents, fill them out according to the directions and provide copies to those you have chosen, someone you trust wholly and completely.

It’s a really good idea to file copies of the documents with your primary doctor and local hospital. They can, in turn, provide them to facilities you may be admitted to when away from home, so they will be able to follow your wishes if you are unable to tell them yourself. It’s also a great idea to carry them with you, even inside your permit book for easy access, so emergency personnel can honor your requests in the event that you cannot speak for yourself.

Make sure that someone you trust knows where all your important papers are; your insurance policies, will and any other important documents that your family would need. You could even make additional copies for that person and store the originals in a safe or safe deposit box.

If you have items that you would like to see go to certain people in the event of your death, make a list. This is especially important if they aren’t specifically mentioned in your will. This is the best way to make it known whom you want to get what. This helped a great deal when my mom passed away 10 years ago. It didn’t take much time and it all helped us so much, so we all knew we each had exactly what she wanted us to have, which made it even more precious to each of us.

One last tip, keep your beneficiaries and power of attorney up to date. Sometimes people change, get married, divorces occur, etc. It’s a good idea to revisit those questions every so often to be sure the answers are still relevant to your life! Once you have done this it will be a huge weight off of your shoulders. You can relax and enjoy your family, knowing you have done everything possible to look after them.

Stay Safe Out There And Keep It Shiny!


Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


 

Trucker Tax Tips

Make the Most of Your Deductions

By Heather Hogeland & Kim Grimm

The dreaded tax season may be a distant memory for some, but for those who filed extensions or who may have missed something for this year, there’s always the amended return. Next year will be here before you know it, so here’s a few tips so you don’t miss any deductions you deserve and are entitled to take.

Of course owner-operators can deduct all of the expenses of running their truck.  If you are a company driver and you can itemize, you are eligible to take deductions for things that you might do your truck with your company’s permission.  All those shiny parts are deductible, so keep the receipts!

If you are new to the road, welcome! Now is a good time to set up a system, if you haven’t already. Hopefully this will help you learn what receipts you need to keep to help lower the tax you have to pay or to get a bigger refund.

Make the Most of Your Deductions- The dreaded tax season may be a distant memory for some, but for those who filed extensions or who may have missed something for this year, there’s always the amended return. Next year will be here before you know it, so here’s a few tips so you don’t miss any deductions you deserve and are entitled to take.CLEANING SUPPLIES: All cleaning supplies such as window cleaners, air fresheners, trash bags, chrome and stainless polish, cleaning tools such as brooms, brushes, and vacuums are deductible.

ELECTRONICS: Any electronics that you use in the truck such as your CB radio and any repairs it might need, GPS, SiriusXM satellite radio and fees, cell phone and fees, alarms, Bluetooth headsets, antennas, power cords, etc.  I think you get the idea, keep the receipts and file them accordingly.

OTHER INTERIOR SUPPLIES: Truck supplies such as fans, coolers, heated blankets, cookware you use in the truck, thermos, seat cushions, seat covers, rugs, visors can qualify as deductible.

FEES & TOLLS: All those dreaded fees can be deducted too! ATM fees, Comcheck fees, CDL license, parking, tolls, drug testing, scales, lumpers, hazmat endorsement, TWIC card and any other expense like this. Association dues like OOIDA or WIT can also be deducted, even magazine subscriptions for trade magazines. Company drivers can only deduct things like tolls, scales and lumpers if your company does not reimburse you for them; otherwise it is the company’s deduction.

PERSONAL HYGIENE: When you do laundry on the road keep track of how much money you put in the washer and dryers along with the cost of detergents you use. If you have to pay for a shower, get the receipt! Soaps, shampoo and other items related to personal hygiene that you buy and use on the road are deductible.

TOOLS: The tools you buy and use in your truck such as flashlights, batteries, hammer, tire thumper, screw drivers, pliers, bolt cutters, electrical tape, duct tape, wrenches, sockets and ratchets; as well as office supplies, little notebooks, pens, rulers, log books, log book covers, staples, stapler, calculator, white out, clipboards, briefcase, an atlas, paper clips and any other office supplies that you might need or use in your truck are deductible.

CARGO SUPPLIES: Everything you use to secure or mark your loads like chains, binders, straps, load locks, load bars, bungees, flashing lights, oversize load signs and tape to secure them – all deductible.

TIME ON THE ROAD: Keep track of your days away from home. This deduction can be huge if you don’t get home much – – even if you are home a lot, keep track of all the days you’re away because they add up! Your logs prove your days out and there are some areas of the country where the deduction is greater. Check with your tax preparer.

OTHER BUSINESS EXPENSES: If you have to pay for a hotel room, incur expenses flying, bus or cab fare, or you incur travel expenses looking for a job, starting a new job or quitting a job; all can be deductions. Owner-operators who are new to the business can deduct all maintenance and repairs that you perform, hard parts, any finance charges, accounting and tax preparation charges. Keep track of the mileage on your car when you are running to get parts or truck supplies, that can be deducted too!

MISCELANIOUS: Of course you will need a miscellaneous file for everything that doesn’t fit in a specific category such as bedding, storage solutions, hats, coats, gloves, required uniforms, required safety equipment, hard hats, vests, safety glasses, steel toe boots or shoes, dry cleaning uniforms for some.

Make sure you hire a tax preparer that is familiar with the trucking industry. Someone who is not can miss deductions you are entitled to and cost you money. You may be very surprised at what can be legitimate deductions. Anytime you go to a truck show or trade show, it can be a deduction. Again, make sure you hire someone who is very familiar with our industry so they can help you take advantage of every single deduction out there for you.

Stay Safe Out There & Keep It Shiny!

Trucker Tax Tips | Trucker Tips


 Heather Hogeland and Kim Grimm are CDL holders and longtime friends with a combined 75 years and 7 million miles of driving experience. Both are writers and have a love for everything trucking, as well as, furry, four-legged friends. Kim is currently a full-time owner-operator and part-time writer. Heather writes for various trucking publications and enjoys traveling with her husband Roger.


IOWA80.COM and its affiliates do not provide tax, legal or accounting advice. This material has been prepared for informational purposes only. You should consult your own tax, legal or accounting advisor.